Charles Sloan Jr.

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Charles Sloan Jr.
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Country Tanzania
Years: 1992-1994
Site(s) Kartu
Program(s) Education
Assignment(s) Literacy Ed.warning.png"Literacy Ed." is not in the list of possible values (Agroforestry, Sustainable Agricultural Science, Farm Management and Agribusiness, Animal Husbandry, Municipal Development, Small Business Development, NGO Development, Urban and Regional Planning, Primary Teacher/Training, Secondary Teacher/Training, Math/Science Teacher/Training, Special Education/Training, Deaf/Education, Vocational Teacher/Training, University Teacher/Training, English Teacher/Training (TEFL), Environmental Education, National Park Management, Dry Land Natural Resource Conservation, Fisheries Fresh, Ecotourism Development, Coastal /Fisheries Resource Management, Public Health Education, AIDS Awareness, Information Technology, Skilled Trades, Water and Sanitation Resources Engineering, Housing Construction Development, Youth, Other) for this property.
Charles Sloan Jr. started in Tanzania 1992
Brian Bramson, Charles Sloan Jr., Matt Warwick
Education in Tanzania:Education.gif
Brian Bramson, Meili Hau, Mark Q, George, Charles Sloan Jr., Bob Taft, Matt Warwick
Other Volunteers who served in Tanzania
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Edmund Blair Bolles, Brian Bramson, Joseph Chow, Elizabeth Monk, Tara (Wilson) Graham, Meili Hau, Peverly Kinsey, Wyatt Pillsbury, Mark Q, Mark Raymaker, David Schaeffer, George, Charles Sloan Jr., Bob Taft, David Tye … further results
Projects in Tanzania
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A Dry Student is a Good Student Masaga Tanzania, Basketball Court, Center and School for Orphans, Chicken Raising Income Generation, Dairy Initiative, Health Dispensary, Kitchen for Secondary School, Maternity Ward at Health Clinic, Medical Staff Housing for Village Dispensary, Nianjema Secondary School, Primary School and Community Library, Resource Room Expansion, Rural Health Center, School Improvement, School Kitchen, School Laboratory Expansion, School Toilet Construction, School Toilet Construction (Tanzania) 2, Secondary School Computer Lab, Secondary School Science Lab
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[edit] About

Charles Sloan, Jr., Manager of Nianjema Secondary School, former Peace Corps Volunteer, USA citizen, graduate of Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University.

Charlie Sloan entered into the Peace Corps in November, 1992. He was assigned to teach math and science at Karatu Secondary and High School in Karatu, Tanzania. It was a government boarding school located in a small town about halfway between Arusha, a large city and Ngorogoro Crater, a world-famous park, each several hours away. One of his students was Frank Manase,a personable, bright and eager-to-learn young fellow. As time went by the teacher and student became friends. Charlie taught him to play chess and they played often together. Charlie encouraged Frank to continue his education. Frank went to the university to study medicine.

After Charlie finished his Peace Corps tour he remained in Tanzania, teaching at a girls school in Bagamoyo. In 1999 he realized that there were as many smart young people on the street as in school. Tanzania was educating only 20% of its eligible students. Why not build a new school? He looked up Frank Manase who was in medical school in Dar es Salaam. Frank liked the idea and encouraged Charlie. Frank had a brother, Dan who was an architect looking for work and an uncle, Gideon who understood government red tape. They agreed to work together to build a school to be called Nianjema -"Good Intentions" in Swahili.

Charlie took the remaining money in his college fund and purchased 15 acres of vacant land in Bagamoyo and persuaded his parents to start fund-raising in the United States. The school opened to 90 students in 2000. Charlie organized the school and now manages itday-to-day. Frank Manase, M.D. chairs the school board and provides advice. Dan Manase designed all the buildings and supervises construction.

As of January 2009 Nianjema Secondary and High School has a 25 acre campus, with three large classroom buildings, science lab, a library, computer lab, large assembly hall, administration building, two large student hostels and nine houses for teachers. Under construction are two more large classroom buildings, another science lab and high school library. There are over 400 students in the school. The students test scores place the school in the top 10-20% of all schools in Tanzania, despite the fact that all the best students are offered scholarships at government schools. Charlie had the idea and the vision and put it all together. The spark came from Frank Manase. All this started with a friendly game of chess.

[edit] Article from Virginia Tech Magazine

Source: http://www.vtmagazine.vt.edu/sum05/shorts.html

"In the United States, a free public education is a right granted to every child. In Tanzania, however, limited facilities mean that only 20 percent of eligible students attend secondary school.

Seeing this shortage firsthand, former Peace Corps volunteer Charlie Sloan (mechanical engineering '92), who had taught at a government boarding school and a private school in Tanzania, knew something needed to be done. At his father's suggestion, Sloan and three Tanzanian friends began construction of a school on a 15-acre plot in Bagamoyo, a port town on the Indian Ocean, and in January 2001, Nianjema Secondary School opened its doors to 90 students.

The original building plan contained only four classrooms, but thanks to efforts spearheaded by Sloan's parents in Vienna, Va., the school received money and supplies from more than 200 donors. As a result of this ongoing benevolence, Nianjema School now has 12 classrooms, two science labs, and two computer labs, and 16 faculty members teach classes in English, math, biology, chemistry, physics, Kiswahili (the local language), history, geography, civics, commerce, bookkeeping, and computer studies to more than 200 students.

As school manager and accountant, Sloan contributes to every aspect of running the school, as well as advising the library and teaching sports. "I'm involved pretty much anywhere money is involved," he admits. "But I also advise the principal about starting new programs for the students and adjusting the way things are run." Those adjustments include plans to expand the school even more. "As I go along," Sloan says, "my dreams get bigger and bigger, more and more possible."

Sloan and other school officials are also making plans to build hostels for the students and a high school and a primary school to increase the area's educational opportunities. They also hope to build a hospital to improve the quality of medical care available to local residents. Currently, medical treatment is limited, and patients often die as a result of negligence, lack of equipment, and reluctance to seek medical help early. "It is very hard work," Sloan says, "but it is satisfying dreaming up the world and then making it happen."

In the United States, a free public education is a right granted to every child. In Tanzania, however, limited facilities mean that only 20 percent of eligible students attend secondary school.

Seeing this shortage firsthand, former Peace Corps volunteer Charlie Sloan (mechanical engineering '92), who had taught at a government boarding school and a private school in Tanzania, knew something needed to be done. At his father's suggestion, Sloan and three Tanzanian friends began construction of a school on a 15-acre plot in Bagamoyo, a port town on the Indian Ocean, and in January 2001, Nianjema Secondary School opened its doors to 90 students.

The original building plan contained only four classrooms, but thanks to efforts spearheaded by Sloan's parents in Vienna, Va., the school received money and supplies from more than 200 donors. As a result of this ongoing benevolence, Nianjema School now has 12 classrooms, two science labs, and two computer labs, and 16 faculty members teach classes in English, math, biology, chemistry, physics, Kiswahili (the local language), history, geography, civics, commerce, bookkeeping, and computer studies to more than 200 students.

As school manager and accountant, Sloan contributes to every aspect of running the school, as well as advising the library and teaching sports. "I'm involved pretty much anywhere money is involved," he admits. "But I also advise the principal about starting new programs for the students and adjusting the way things are run." Those adjustments include plans to expand the school even more. "As I go along," Sloan says, "my dreams get bigger and bigger, more and more possible."

Sloan and other school officials are also making plans to build hostels for the students and a high school and a primary school to increase the area's educational opportunities. They also hope to build a hospital to improve the quality of medical care available to local residents. Currently, medical treatment is limited, and patients often die as a result of negligence, lack of equipment, and reluctance to seek medical help early. "It is very hard work," Sloan says, "but it is satisfying dreaming up the world and then making it happen."

Source: http://www.vtmagazine.vt.edu/sum05/shorts.html

For more information on Nianjema School, visit http://www.TanzaniaEducation.org.

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